2022 Draft Budget & Five Year Financial Plan

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The 2021 Budget was adopted by Council March 16th, 2021. Information regarding the 2022 budget will be available November, 2021. 

March 15, 2022

Council adopted the 2022-2026 five-year financial plan which includes the 2022 budget.



February 23, 2022

Council gave 2nd and 3rd reading to the five-year financial plan which includes the 2022 budget. Council opted to push the hiring of the newly proposed Deputy Fire Chief to mid-year, reducing the 2022 tax impact. As a result, the 2022 property tax increase is now set at 5.88% which represents an approximate $111 residential property tax increase (based on the 2021 BC Assessment average in Lake Country of $993,000). The five-year financial plan will go to Council for final approval and adoption in March.



February 22, 2022

Tonight beginning at 6:30 pm Council will consider public input received since December, in response to the proposed 2022 budget. On January 4th Council gave first reading to a proposed increase of 6.62%. Now that projected growth figures from BC Assessment have been updated, revisions to the proposed tax increase have been made and Council will consider a 6.12% rather than the original 6.62% tax increase for 2nd & 3rd readings at the February 22, 2022 Special Council Meeting. Watch the Council meeting live or the recording at any time.

Council appreciates the many community members who have taken time to be involved throughout this year’s budget process. Council values the questions and comments submitted through Let’s Talk – Lake Country in addition to the many who took the time to attend the February 8th virtual town hall. Full details on the proposed 2022 budget along with questions and comments received, can be found below.



February 4, 2022

Be sure to review the Citizen Bulletin for complete details on the 2022 Budget.

January 5, 2022 - Communication #2

Community is asked to provide input on the 2022 budget

On January 4th Council reviewed the draft five-year financial plan that includes the draft 2022 budget. After careful consideration of the community input throughout 2021 and taking note of the priorities for municipal services expressed by citizens, Council gave first reading to support a proposed 6.62% increase, however, Council is asking the community to provide comments on the proposed increase. Feedback can be provided through Let’s Talk – Lake Country and by attending the February 8th virtual town hall that will begin at 7:00 pm via Facebook Live and Microsoft Livestream.

The proposed 4.85% base increase consists of expenditures required to maintain current standards including year-round sidewalk and road maintenance and current levels of protective services. The additional 1.77% proposed increase includes engineering and environmental consulting services, line painting, road signage, fleet maintenance, arts & culture, a deputy fire chief as well as various part-time positions. Other proposed expenditures were supported, however Council recommended that the cost be funded for one year, through one time reserve funds and not through a tax increase. The grant was provided to the District from the Province in 2020. Full budget details and breakdown of cost can be found at Let’s Talk – Lake Country.

How does the BC Assessment value impact my municipal tax assessment?

Earlier this month BC Assessment released assessments throughout BC that state the value of properties as of July 2021. The average Lake Country single family home is now valued at $993,000 representing a 30.57% increase from 2021. Property owners might be concerned that due to escalating property values, that their municipal tax assessment will increase by the same percentage. This is a common misconception, and the most important factor is not how much your assessed value has changed, but how your assessed value has changed relative to the average change for your property class within the District:

  • If your property’s value change was Lower than the average change of 30.57% for the residential class, the impact will likely result in a property tax decrease from 2021*.
  • If your property’s value change was Similar to the average change of 30.57% for the residential class, the impact will likely result in no change to your property tax from 2021*.
  • If your property’s value change was Higher than the average change of 30.57% for the residential class, the impact will likely result in a property tax increase from 2021*.

*Prior to considering the 2022 proposed tax increase.

Why is the former firehall not being sold to offset District expenses?

Council made the decision in 2021 to not pursue selling the former firehall for a variety of reasons. As the District continues to grow and expand, so will the need for additional property and space to accommodate functions essential for municipal operations to support the growing community. Council has directed that securing options for the future is essential, due to escalating cost of property within the community.

Stay involved.

Lake Country is your community and it’s your responsibility to be involved as Council makes decisions that impact all property owners. There are several ways to do this.

  1. Know the facts:
  2. Ask questions and provide your comments:
    • Social media is a tool for information and conversation however if you don’t submit your questions and comments through Let’s Talk – Lake Country it’s likely Council won’t see it, and miss the opportunity of knowing what you’re thinking.
  3. Attend the virtual town hall on February 8th beginning at 7:00 pm
    • Council will be available to answer questions and listen to what your community priorities are. Your input is appreciated and valued – please attend.
    • Questions about the virtual town hall? Email communications@lakecountry.bc.ca

Revised - January 4, 2022

Breakdown of 2022 Proposed Increase

Proposed Community Needs

Proposed 2022 Increase

Dollar Value Attributable to Existing Properties

Approximate Average Home Increase

($993,000 – BC Assessment 2021 Avg in Lake Country)

Road Maintenance Contract

1.57%

$262,716

$29.32

Consumer Price Index

1.15%

$193,950

$21.64

RCMP Staff Increase

0.89%

$148,451

$16.57

IT Services Contracts

0.64%

$106,466

$11.88

Phase Out - Fire Servicing Contract

0.43%

$72,139

$8.05

Ecole H.S. Grenda Maintenance of Shared Spaces Increase

0.17%

$28,855

$3.22

Engineering and Environmental Consulting Service

0.12%

$20,000

$2.28

Line Painting

0.12%

$20,000

$2.28

Road Signage

0.12%

$20,000

$2.28

Fleet Maintenance

0.25%

$40,000

$4.57

Additional Arts & Culture

0.05%

$7,000

$0.81

Deputy Fire Chief

0.72%

$118,171

$13.47

Various Part-Time Positions

0.39%

$64,762

$7.38

PROPOSED TOTAL

6.62%

$1,102,510

$123.75




December 23, 2022 - Communication #1

Council to consider property tax increase with an emphasis on road maintenance

On January 4th, 2022 Council will be considering the five (5) year financial plan which includes the 2022 budget. Council will consider a proposed base tax increase of 4.85% along with other budget items that require attention. Council will deliberate on the budget proposal and make the final decisions after carefully reviewing community input gathered throughout the months of January and February -- including a virtual town hall scheduled for February 8th, 2022. Everyone in the community is encouraged to get involved and share their interests and concerns in a meaningful and constructive manner to help shape the 2022 budget.

Proposed Community Needs

Proposed 2022 Increase

Dollar Value Attributable to Existing Properties

Approximate Average Home Increase

($760,000 – BC Assessment 2021 Avg in Lake Country)

Road Maintenance Contract

1.57%

$262,716

$29.32

Consumer Price Index

1.15%

$193,950

$21.64

RCMP Staff Increase

0.89%

$148,451

$16.57

IT Services Contracts

0.64%

$106,466

$11.88

Phase Out - Fire Servicing Contract

0.43%

$72,139

$8.05

Ecole H.S. Grenda Maintenance of Shared Spaces Increase

0.17%

$28,855

$3.22


For each 0.01% added to the budget - the average home will pay approximately an additional $0.19 towards municipal services.

Municipalities in BC are governed by the Province and have a requirement to provide the community roads, water, waste water and policing. Each year the District must have an approved budget that is linked to a five (5) year financial plan. The proposed yearly budget is linked to population growth as well as a careful review of what services and facilities the community requires throughout the calendar year.

Road Maintenance Contract:

With severe weather events becoming increasingly frequent and the safety of the community being paramount, the need to plan for additional snow clearing of both roads and sidewalks is necessary. In addition, the District is responsible for de-icing, street sweeping, and maintenance of gravel roads, while continuously ensuring established levels of service are maintained. These services all come with a cost. Local to Lake Country- the team at Digg’N 4 U, provides the community with timely and responsive road maintenance, with the goal of keeping Lake Country safe year-round.

Consumer Price Index:

Consumer Price Index also known as CPI, is used to measure the average cost change over time in the prices paid for goods and services, and accounts for inflation. Inflation for services has risen significantly over the past 12 months ranging from 3.5% - 4% in BC. As a result, there has been increases on most goods and services costs in addition to wage and benefit increases.

RCMP Staff Increase:

In 2020 Council approved the cost of acquiring five (5) additional RCMP officers. Half the cost of the new officers was incorporated into the 2020 budget and the second half in 2021. Currently the Lake Country detachment has a compliment of 14 RCMP members and adequate budget to recruit additional members to support the community as we continue to grow. In 2021 the collective agreement for the RCMP was ratified resulting in a 23.7% wage increase over six years. RCMP wages and wage increases are to be budgeted by the municipality they support.

IT Service Contracts:

Streamlining building and development permit applications, improving data management processes, and boosting efficiencies requires substantial upgrades to the District’s technology platforms. In addition to implementing service contracts with vendors, annual fees must be budgeted for. Technology along with process improvements will result in enhanced customer service levels.

Phase Out - Fire Servicing Contract:

In 2021 the City of Kelowna phased out the fire protection contract they had in place with the District of Lake Country Fire Department. This resulted in a net reduction in revenue from the prior year budget.

École H S Grenda Middle Maintenance of Shared Spaces:

Earlier this year the new middle school opened its doors welcoming grade six (6) and seven (7) students as well as offering the French immersion program. The District has the opportunity to utilize common areas of the middle school to offer programming to the community. The proposed lease arrangement will be similar to the agreement that has provided community programing at George Elliot Secondary School.

Share your Viewpoint:

Council wants to hear what you think about the five (5) year financial plan and the 2022 budget. On January 4th beginning at 4:30 pm Council will review the proposed financial plan in detail at the Special Council Meeting, and you are invited to join in person or virtually from the comfort of your home on any device. On February 8th join Council for a virtual town hall. This will be an excellent opportunity to ask questions and tell Council what your priorities are for Lake Country. Review the five (5) year financial plan, documents, important meeting dates, links, and to submit questions or comments visit Let’s Talk-Lake Country.

Stay informed

Receive updates directly sent to your inbox, as Council goes through the five (5) year financial plan and 2022 budget process. Subscribe at www.lakecountry.bc.ca/subscribe


March 15, 2022

Council adopted the 2022-2026 five-year financial plan which includes the 2022 budget.



February 23, 2022

Council gave 2nd and 3rd reading to the five-year financial plan which includes the 2022 budget. Council opted to push the hiring of the newly proposed Deputy Fire Chief to mid-year, reducing the 2022 tax impact. As a result, the 2022 property tax increase is now set at 5.88% which represents an approximate $111 residential property tax increase (based on the 2021 BC Assessment average in Lake Country of $993,000). The five-year financial plan will go to Council for final approval and adoption in March.



February 22, 2022

Tonight beginning at 6:30 pm Council will consider public input received since December, in response to the proposed 2022 budget. On January 4th Council gave first reading to a proposed increase of 6.62%. Now that projected growth figures from BC Assessment have been updated, revisions to the proposed tax increase have been made and Council will consider a 6.12% rather than the original 6.62% tax increase for 2nd & 3rd readings at the February 22, 2022 Special Council Meeting. Watch the Council meeting live or the recording at any time.

Council appreciates the many community members who have taken time to be involved throughout this year’s budget process. Council values the questions and comments submitted through Let’s Talk – Lake Country in addition to the many who took the time to attend the February 8th virtual town hall. Full details on the proposed 2022 budget along with questions and comments received, can be found below.



February 4, 2022

Be sure to review the Citizen Bulletin for complete details on the 2022 Budget.

January 5, 2022 - Communication #2

Community is asked to provide input on the 2022 budget

On January 4th Council reviewed the draft five-year financial plan that includes the draft 2022 budget. After careful consideration of the community input throughout 2021 and taking note of the priorities for municipal services expressed by citizens, Council gave first reading to support a proposed 6.62% increase, however, Council is asking the community to provide comments on the proposed increase. Feedback can be provided through Let’s Talk – Lake Country and by attending the February 8th virtual town hall that will begin at 7:00 pm via Facebook Live and Microsoft Livestream.

The proposed 4.85% base increase consists of expenditures required to maintain current standards including year-round sidewalk and road maintenance and current levels of protective services. The additional 1.77% proposed increase includes engineering and environmental consulting services, line painting, road signage, fleet maintenance, arts & culture, a deputy fire chief as well as various part-time positions. Other proposed expenditures were supported, however Council recommended that the cost be funded for one year, through one time reserve funds and not through a tax increase. The grant was provided to the District from the Province in 2020. Full budget details and breakdown of cost can be found at Let’s Talk – Lake Country.

How does the BC Assessment value impact my municipal tax assessment?

Earlier this month BC Assessment released assessments throughout BC that state the value of properties as of July 2021. The average Lake Country single family home is now valued at $993,000 representing a 30.57% increase from 2021. Property owners might be concerned that due to escalating property values, that their municipal tax assessment will increase by the same percentage. This is a common misconception, and the most important factor is not how much your assessed value has changed, but how your assessed value has changed relative to the average change for your property class within the District:

  • If your property’s value change was Lower than the average change of 30.57% for the residential class, the impact will likely result in a property tax decrease from 2021*.
  • If your property’s value change was Similar to the average change of 30.57% for the residential class, the impact will likely result in no change to your property tax from 2021*.
  • If your property’s value change was Higher than the average change of 30.57% for the residential class, the impact will likely result in a property tax increase from 2021*.

*Prior to considering the 2022 proposed tax increase.

Why is the former firehall not being sold to offset District expenses?

Council made the decision in 2021 to not pursue selling the former firehall for a variety of reasons. As the District continues to grow and expand, so will the need for additional property and space to accommodate functions essential for municipal operations to support the growing community. Council has directed that securing options for the future is essential, due to escalating cost of property within the community.

Stay involved.

Lake Country is your community and it’s your responsibility to be involved as Council makes decisions that impact all property owners. There are several ways to do this.

  1. Know the facts:
  2. Ask questions and provide your comments:
    • Social media is a tool for information and conversation however if you don’t submit your questions and comments through Let’s Talk – Lake Country it’s likely Council won’t see it, and miss the opportunity of knowing what you’re thinking.
  3. Attend the virtual town hall on February 8th beginning at 7:00 pm
    • Council will be available to answer questions and listen to what your community priorities are. Your input is appreciated and valued – please attend.
    • Questions about the virtual town hall? Email communications@lakecountry.bc.ca

Revised - January 4, 2022

Breakdown of 2022 Proposed Increase

Proposed Community Needs

Proposed 2022 Increase

Dollar Value Attributable to Existing Properties

Approximate Average Home Increase

($993,000 – BC Assessment 2021 Avg in Lake Country)

Road Maintenance Contract

1.57%

$262,716

$29.32

Consumer Price Index

1.15%

$193,950

$21.64

RCMP Staff Increase

0.89%

$148,451

$16.57

IT Services Contracts

0.64%

$106,466

$11.88

Phase Out - Fire Servicing Contract

0.43%

$72,139

$8.05

Ecole H.S. Grenda Maintenance of Shared Spaces Increase

0.17%

$28,855

$3.22

Engineering and Environmental Consulting Service

0.12%

$20,000

$2.28

Line Painting

0.12%

$20,000

$2.28

Road Signage

0.12%

$20,000

$2.28

Fleet Maintenance

0.25%

$40,000

$4.57

Additional Arts & Culture

0.05%

$7,000

$0.81

Deputy Fire Chief

0.72%

$118,171

$13.47

Various Part-Time Positions

0.39%

$64,762

$7.38

PROPOSED TOTAL

6.62%

$1,102,510

$123.75




December 23, 2022 - Communication #1

Council to consider property tax increase with an emphasis on road maintenance

On January 4th, 2022 Council will be considering the five (5) year financial plan which includes the 2022 budget. Council will consider a proposed base tax increase of 4.85% along with other budget items that require attention. Council will deliberate on the budget proposal and make the final decisions after carefully reviewing community input gathered throughout the months of January and February -- including a virtual town hall scheduled for February 8th, 2022. Everyone in the community is encouraged to get involved and share their interests and concerns in a meaningful and constructive manner to help shape the 2022 budget.

Proposed Community Needs

Proposed 2022 Increase

Dollar Value Attributable to Existing Properties

Approximate Average Home Increase

($760,000 – BC Assessment 2021 Avg in Lake Country)

Road Maintenance Contract

1.57%

$262,716

$29.32

Consumer Price Index

1.15%

$193,950

$21.64

RCMP Staff Increase

0.89%

$148,451

$16.57

IT Services Contracts

0.64%

$106,466

$11.88

Phase Out - Fire Servicing Contract

0.43%

$72,139

$8.05

Ecole H.S. Grenda Maintenance of Shared Spaces Increase

0.17%

$28,855

$3.22


For each 0.01% added to the budget - the average home will pay approximately an additional $0.19 towards municipal services.

Municipalities in BC are governed by the Province and have a requirement to provide the community roads, water, waste water and policing. Each year the District must have an approved budget that is linked to a five (5) year financial plan. The proposed yearly budget is linked to population growth as well as a careful review of what services and facilities the community requires throughout the calendar year.

Road Maintenance Contract:

With severe weather events becoming increasingly frequent and the safety of the community being paramount, the need to plan for additional snow clearing of both roads and sidewalks is necessary. In addition, the District is responsible for de-icing, street sweeping, and maintenance of gravel roads, while continuously ensuring established levels of service are maintained. These services all come with a cost. Local to Lake Country- the team at Digg’N 4 U, provides the community with timely and responsive road maintenance, with the goal of keeping Lake Country safe year-round.

Consumer Price Index:

Consumer Price Index also known as CPI, is used to measure the average cost change over time in the prices paid for goods and services, and accounts for inflation. Inflation for services has risen significantly over the past 12 months ranging from 3.5% - 4% in BC. As a result, there has been increases on most goods and services costs in addition to wage and benefit increases.

RCMP Staff Increase:

In 2020 Council approved the cost of acquiring five (5) additional RCMP officers. Half the cost of the new officers was incorporated into the 2020 budget and the second half in 2021. Currently the Lake Country detachment has a compliment of 14 RCMP members and adequate budget to recruit additional members to support the community as we continue to grow. In 2021 the collective agreement for the RCMP was ratified resulting in a 23.7% wage increase over six years. RCMP wages and wage increases are to be budgeted by the municipality they support.

IT Service Contracts:

Streamlining building and development permit applications, improving data management processes, and boosting efficiencies requires substantial upgrades to the District’s technology platforms. In addition to implementing service contracts with vendors, annual fees must be budgeted for. Technology along with process improvements will result in enhanced customer service levels.

Phase Out - Fire Servicing Contract:

In 2021 the City of Kelowna phased out the fire protection contract they had in place with the District of Lake Country Fire Department. This resulted in a net reduction in revenue from the prior year budget.

École H S Grenda Middle Maintenance of Shared Spaces:

Earlier this year the new middle school opened its doors welcoming grade six (6) and seven (7) students as well as offering the French immersion program. The District has the opportunity to utilize common areas of the middle school to offer programming to the community. The proposed lease arrangement will be similar to the agreement that has provided community programing at George Elliot Secondary School.

Share your Viewpoint:

Council wants to hear what you think about the five (5) year financial plan and the 2022 budget. On January 4th beginning at 4:30 pm Council will review the proposed financial plan in detail at the Special Council Meeting, and you are invited to join in person or virtually from the comfort of your home on any device. On February 8th join Council for a virtual town hall. This will be an excellent opportunity to ask questions and tell Council what your priorities are for Lake Country. Review the five (5) year financial plan, documents, important meeting dates, links, and to submit questions or comments visit Let’s Talk-Lake Country.

Stay informed

Receive updates directly sent to your inbox, as Council goes through the five (5) year financial plan and 2022 budget process. Subscribe at www.lakecountry.bc.ca/subscribe


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

If you have a question or comment regarding the 2022 Budget or the Five Year Financial Plan - please feel free to submit and one of the District's team members will respond back to you. All questions and comments will be provided to Council for their review.

Thank you in advance for participating.

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    Why is there $20000 for Road signage? Is there a need for that? Do we not pay $125 a year for Road Renewal and Improvement already? $20000 for line painting, for where in our district? Since we are encouraged for clearing snow in front of our property Why not make us responsible for clearing like Kelowna and save money.

    Sheila asked 6 months ago

    Road Signage is an operational expense that includes: repair and renewal of existing signs and additional signs as needed to assist with public safety and encourage bylaw compliance. As the District's population increases and more vehicles use the roads the need for more signage has resulted. Increased material costs are also included as part of the request. The request put forward for additional funding is to maintain the current level of service. 

    Line painting is another operational expense similar to signage in that it assists in getting residents around in a safe and efficient manner. Line painting occurs throughout the District on an annual basis. Supply chain issues and weather events have resulted in significant increases in material costs. The request put forward for additional funding is to maintain the current level of service.

    The $125 per year for Road Renewal and Improvement is a parcel levy that goes towards funding the Transportation for Tomorrow renewal program. This program is being updated as part of the Mobility Master Plan and will be implemented as the Mobility Improvement Program.

    Sidewalk snow clearing is included in the Roads Maintenance Contract and is a level of service set by Council. Residents are encouraged to clear their sidewalks to improve this service level especially on lower priority roads. Sidewalk clearing was previously added as a service in response to concerns regarding sidewalks not being cleared. As the District continues to grow and expand mobility connections the desire to have these connections usable throughout the winter months increases and is vital to users who rely on the connections.

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    Is there any plans to increase the recreation facilities within lake county in the next few years such as the addition of a public pool

    Matt asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the question. 

    Within the five year financial plan there is budget allocated for a Sports and Recreation needs assessment. Please take a look at a recent article written to help explain why Lake Country does not have a community pool at this time.

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    You explanation of cost per capita makes a lot of sense. Thanks fr doing all you do to keep our community going. It sounds to me like allowing subdivision of properties and removing the bylaw regaurding no new builds unless connected to city sewer. Septic systems have come a long ways into the future and would drastically reduce the load and cost and removal of a city sewer system.

    Oyama Fireman #66 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the comments and it's our pleasure to help the community understand the budget process. Please reach out anytime you have a question or comment for staff or Council.

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    In my previous question Re: Funding for Okanagan Centre Road West I was directed to the Transportation for Tomorrow Plan. Upon reviewing that in detail I have two follow up questions to improve the safety on Okanagan Centre West between Glenmore Drive and McCoubrey Road. This is an increasingly high traffic road and is very narrow with no shoulders. In addition, the edge of the road repeatedly deteriorates causing major hazards for motorists, especially when oncoming large vehicles force the vehicles to the edge of the road on corners. I have spoken to several people who have potentially lost control hitting this deterioration on the edge of this "no shoulder" road. Monies spent by Lake Country late last year spreading dirt to attempt to smooth the shoulders was a waste of funding as it is quickly deteriorating once again. I struggle to understand how this road was assessed in the Transportation for Tomorrow Appendix C - Proposed 20 Year Road Renewal and Improvement Comprehensive List? This section of road is listed in the 11-20 year category on page 51. Yet the road is significantly beyond “patchwork repairs” when compared to several sections of road in the 0-5 Year category on page 49. On page 43 it states "Distresses were then entered into the Transportation for Tomorrow database”, It appears there is much more traffic on this road now with the rapid development of Lakestone since this report was published in 2014 and likely assessed in 2012 - 2014. Therefore, my first question is: A. “Can the Appendix C - Proposed 20 year road renewal and improvement comprehensive list be “revisited" with respect to this section of road as it compares to higher rated roads on the list?” B. "Alternatively, can maintenance funding be applied to pave the edge of this road to create a shoulder that does not degrade so rapidly causing these unsafe conditions?" In addition, the Okanagan Centre Road West turnoff at Glenmore Drive is extremely dark at night time. When driving northbound on Glenmore at night, and turning left onto Okanagan Centre Road West, it is extremely blind especially with other vehicle headlights waiting on Okanagan Centre Road West to turn on to Glenmore. I challenge any councillor to try making this turn at night time. Therefore, my second question is "Can some street lighting be added at this location to improve safety?” Thank you

    Bruce S asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the question.

    Mobility Improvement Program assessment is currently being worked on and will be published for the community to review later this year. Other projects that the District will be undertaking such as the Glenmore Industrial lands development and servicing plan upgrades and the waste water site enhancements are tied to road network improvements. If project plans stay on schedule the road network will be enhanced within the next five to ten years. 

    In the fall of 2021, road crews undertook shoulder enhancements revitalization from McCoubrey Road to Glenmore. Beginning this spring crews will continue work of patching the edges.  

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    What is the schedule for repaving north Glenmore and Okanagan Centre West?

    Bill asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the question.

    The plan for repaving the road between the North end of Glenmore and OK Centre West is correlated to the the Glenmore Industrial lands development and servicing plan upgrades as well as the waste water site enhancements. If project plans stay on schedule the road will be enhanced and repaved within the next five years.

    Both projects will significantly disrupt the roads and serve as an ideal opportunity to upgrade impacted roads at that time.   

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    We have a special budget for play ground equipment upgrades, recreation facilities upgrade and a new fire hall. All of these things are great but when are we going to get to fixing our streets. In particular Glenmore road, Sherman drive and The old section of Teresa Roan. Currently you need the whole street to dodge the pot holes. They have been filling the pot holes for 5 - 7 years and the patch lasts 2 - 3 months and then we have the same issue again.

    Randy asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for providing your comments.

    Weather conditions when potholes are repaired in winter do not lend themselves to long term repairs. Colder temperatures and wet surfaces make it difficult to get the repair material to stick permanently. Many of these repairs require touch-ups or re-do's in the spring when the weather is more favorable. 

    The roads team uses cold mix asphalt products to repair potholes in the winter as it is formulated to work better in colder wetter conditions. Usually by mid-April the District switches to using hot mix asphalt for repairs as it can be more permanent.  We still continue to utilize cold mix on smaller potholes throughout the year.

    Sections of Glenmore Rd, Sherman Dr and Lodge Rd have been overlayed in the past with 1 to 1.5 inches of new asphalt applied on top of the existing road surface. Most of the potholes in these sections is the overlay asphalt breaking up. These potholes are very problematic to repair as the roads crew struggles to get a compacted product to adhere to the bottom layer of asphalt when it is this thin. The usual cause of this is water getting between the two layers which makes it very hard to stop from re-occurring or spreading to other locations.

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    Question to Lake Country – Lets Talk website – Feb 6, 2022 I have 2 questions/comments: 1. Property Taxes I am appalled at the proposed property tax increase of 6.62%. (as of Feb 2022). The initial proposed budget was calculated at 4. 85% (up to Dec 2021). Even the 4.85% increase is difficult to comprehend, when other municipalities in BC (listed below*) are under 4.1%. Many families are struggling to make ends meet in these pandemic times. I believe the district and council needs to sharpen their pencil and find ways to reduce the proposed rate to below 4%. The question should be asked with each line item is “is this a NEED to have?”, or “is this a NICE to have? The “nice to haves” should be given a second look. Perhaps some projects or hiring of additional staff could be put on hold this year. I know this is being done in other municipalities to keep the tax increase low. As a former government employee who took a 5% wage roll back in the 1990’s, there are some tough choices that can be made. We’ve all individually had to make hard choices financially, and I firmly believe the District can do much better than the proposed 6.62% tax increase. *Property tax increases proposed in: Cranbrook 2.75 % Salmon Arm 4.03% Summerland 3.9% West Kelowna 4.0% Kelowna 3.64% 2. Fire Hall I feel the tax payers have been misled when we voted for the new fire hall. At that time, the old fire hall property was to be sold with an estimated value of $1M. Property values have increased since then, so not sure what the current value would be. Now the District wants to keep the old fire hall, and re-purpose it, which I feel would be a “money pit”. This building is very old and falling apart. To see that there is a proposed $20K Environmental and Asbestos Assessments included in the proposed budget infuriates me. Then there’s the cost of asbestos mitigation and renovations to the building. Where will that money come from? So, now instead of having the $1M in the Districts coffers, there is a shortfall of $1M from the sale of the old fire hall. Where is that money coming from? Sell the property as was initially proposed and presented to the taxpayers and pay down the debt. Has the Rail Trail debt been paid for yet?

    Annette asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the questions and comments. 

    The rail trail debt as of December, 2021 has a balance of $2 million and is projected to be paid off by 2035.

    Comments regarding the firehall property and proposed tax increase will be passed onto Council. 

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    I do not see any funding identified to improve Okanagan Centre West road, from Glenmore to the new dog park. This road has very high usage, and growing steadily, zero shoulders and significant continuous large potholes re-occurring after every temporary fix on the edges. When approaching large trucks on corners drivers are forced to the edges resulting in hitting those large potholes and damaging wheel alignments. In addition there is no pedestrian or bicycle path. Why is there no funding approved for this road? Especially considering the many new large property tax dollars being generated in Lakestone?

    Bruce Schiewe asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the comment and questions - they will be passed onto Council. 

    Road and infrastructure projects are guided by the Transportation for Tomorrow Plan as well as the Mobility Master Plan.  

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    Is there a document available which shows 2022 budget and 2021 budget and actual (or preliminary). I understand that audited results for 2021 are not available, but preliminary or draft results should be available for information.

    John Plant asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for the question.

    The District does not currently have 2021 actuals to provide and are in the process of working through the year end close process. Financial Statements are provided to Council and the public in May of each calendar year.

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    Lake Country had a net financial assets of about $21,153,000) at the end of 2020. What were (unaudited) net financial assets at the end of 2021?

    John Plant asked 7 months ago

    Thank you for the question.

    Staff is in the process of working through year end and do not yet have this information available. In the event of a surplus, the surplus would be allocated to District reserves in line with Reserve Fund Policy 195, 2022, in the event of a deficit, Council would be presented with options on how to fund the deficit using existing reserves.