Water Master Plan Update

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Water Availability Workshop - November 4th

Sign up today to participate in the November 4th Water Availability Workshop at Beasley Community Centre. Details can be found here.



July 18th, 2023

Council approved the 2023 Water Master Plan at the Regular Council meeting.


May 16, 2023

Take a moment to read You Asked - what is the purpose of the water conservation plan? Find out the facts on why the District is working on the plan.


April 18, 2023

Thank you to those who provided feedback on the Lake Country Water Conservation Plan. Commenting has been extended to May 8th.

Congratulations to the three winners of Local Lake Country $100 gift certificates (randomly drawn on April 18th).

  • Alison B - Pane Vino
  • Elizabeth V - Pane Vino
  • Tom B - Block One

April 5, 2023

Feedback Required: Lake Country Water Conservation Plan

Summer is fast approaching and with Okanagan summers getting warmer each year, the topic of water conservation is top of mind for many. As part of the ongoing work being completed to revise the District’s Water Master Plan a Water Conservation Plan has also been drafted.

Regardless of who you are in the community water is a vital resource that we all share. We use it for drinking, washing, flushing, fire protection and irrigation. With nearly half of Lake Country being within the Agricultural Land Reserve, agriculture depends on reliable water supply for our food production. For all these reasons our community has to make water conservation a priority.

Please take the time to look over the Draft Water Conservation Plan and provide feedback (found at the bottom of this page) by April 18th. To thank you for your time anyone who provides feedback by April 18th will be entered into a draw to win one (1) of three (3) $100 gift certificates for any Lake Country business.

**If you would like your name entered into the draw please email letstalk@lakecountry.bc.ca**

Interested in joining the Water Advisory Committee?

Council is actively looking for new members to join the advisory committee to provide input and feedback on water use and initiatives in Lake Country. Please consider applying by submitting an email outlining your interest in water. Emails can be sent to admin@lakecountry.bc.ca


Congratulations to the three winners of Local Lake Country $100 gift certificates (randomly drawn on June 6th)

  • Chris Kalinovich - $100 Gift Certificate to Grillers Meats
  • Kelsey Wilson - $100 to Pane Vino
  • Zack Martin - $100 to GoGo Sushi

Water Master Plan Survey will remain open for community feedback until June 10th


Council Needs Your Input on the 2022 Water Master Plan Refresh Project.

Water is used for drinking, washing, flushing, fire protection and irrigation. With nearly half of Lake Country being within the Agricultural Land Reserve, agriculture depends on reliable water supply for food production. .

You might be surprised by the enormous infrastructure requirements to supply Lake Country with water. These include pumps, reservoirs, and piping in addition to a qualified team available all day, everyday to maintain and manage the water network.

The District of Lake Country is in the process of refreshing the current Water Master Plan. The plan was last updated in 2012 and needs to be revised for different reasons. Council understands the issues the community is facing but is looking for feedback from the community on how to implement positive change and long-term solutions within the community.

The four wards in Lake Country - Oyama, Winfield, Okanagan Centre and Carr’s Landing each have unique challenges that need to be separately identified and addressed. Certain areas are at times impacted by water advisories or boil water notices. Ageing infrastructure, undersized piping and fire suppression insufficiencies in certain areas of the community, also add to the problem. With various private water systems throughout the District finding the right long term solutions requires a significant amount of community engagement.

Lake Country, like all other communities worldwide, can’t hide from the rapid effects of climate change. Each year we are seeing increased negative impacts and securing reliable water supply for everyone in our community will continue to be an ongoing challenge. Lake Country is growing at an accelerated pace and time is running out - these issues need to be tackled soon.

As a community we need to make decisions that reflect caring for the community while not compromising the health, safety and wellness of citizens and the environment.

What is important to you?

Lake Country tell Council what’s important to you. Now is the time to get involved in the 2022 Water Master Plan Revision. Take a moment to watch the three-minute whiteboard video to better understand the issues. The project team has also provided several links to help you find information you need to fill in the brief survey found below. Council appreciates your feedback in order to make informed decisions. Please fill in the survey by June 3rd. If you leave your email address you will be entered to win one of three $100 gift certificates for a restaurant of choice in Lake Country.


Water Availability Workshop - November 4th

Sign up today to participate in the November 4th Water Availability Workshop at Beasley Community Centre. Details can be found here.



July 18th, 2023

Council approved the 2023 Water Master Plan at the Regular Council meeting.


May 16, 2023

Take a moment to read You Asked - what is the purpose of the water conservation plan? Find out the facts on why the District is working on the plan.


April 18, 2023

Thank you to those who provided feedback on the Lake Country Water Conservation Plan. Commenting has been extended to May 8th.

Congratulations to the three winners of Local Lake Country $100 gift certificates (randomly drawn on April 18th).

  • Alison B - Pane Vino
  • Elizabeth V - Pane Vino
  • Tom B - Block One

April 5, 2023

Feedback Required: Lake Country Water Conservation Plan

Summer is fast approaching and with Okanagan summers getting warmer each year, the topic of water conservation is top of mind for many. As part of the ongoing work being completed to revise the District’s Water Master Plan a Water Conservation Plan has also been drafted.

Regardless of who you are in the community water is a vital resource that we all share. We use it for drinking, washing, flushing, fire protection and irrigation. With nearly half of Lake Country being within the Agricultural Land Reserve, agriculture depends on reliable water supply for our food production. For all these reasons our community has to make water conservation a priority.

Please take the time to look over the Draft Water Conservation Plan and provide feedback (found at the bottom of this page) by April 18th. To thank you for your time anyone who provides feedback by April 18th will be entered into a draw to win one (1) of three (3) $100 gift certificates for any Lake Country business.

**If you would like your name entered into the draw please email letstalk@lakecountry.bc.ca**

Interested in joining the Water Advisory Committee?

Council is actively looking for new members to join the advisory committee to provide input and feedback on water use and initiatives in Lake Country. Please consider applying by submitting an email outlining your interest in water. Emails can be sent to admin@lakecountry.bc.ca


Congratulations to the three winners of Local Lake Country $100 gift certificates (randomly drawn on June 6th)

  • Chris Kalinovich - $100 Gift Certificate to Grillers Meats
  • Kelsey Wilson - $100 to Pane Vino
  • Zack Martin - $100 to GoGo Sushi

Water Master Plan Survey will remain open for community feedback until June 10th


Council Needs Your Input on the 2022 Water Master Plan Refresh Project.

Water is used for drinking, washing, flushing, fire protection and irrigation. With nearly half of Lake Country being within the Agricultural Land Reserve, agriculture depends on reliable water supply for food production. .

You might be surprised by the enormous infrastructure requirements to supply Lake Country with water. These include pumps, reservoirs, and piping in addition to a qualified team available all day, everyday to maintain and manage the water network.

The District of Lake Country is in the process of refreshing the current Water Master Plan. The plan was last updated in 2012 and needs to be revised for different reasons. Council understands the issues the community is facing but is looking for feedback from the community on how to implement positive change and long-term solutions within the community.

The four wards in Lake Country - Oyama, Winfield, Okanagan Centre and Carr’s Landing each have unique challenges that need to be separately identified and addressed. Certain areas are at times impacted by water advisories or boil water notices. Ageing infrastructure, undersized piping and fire suppression insufficiencies in certain areas of the community, also add to the problem. With various private water systems throughout the District finding the right long term solutions requires a significant amount of community engagement.

Lake Country, like all other communities worldwide, can’t hide from the rapid effects of climate change. Each year we are seeing increased negative impacts and securing reliable water supply for everyone in our community will continue to be an ongoing challenge. Lake Country is growing at an accelerated pace and time is running out - these issues need to be tackled soon.

As a community we need to make decisions that reflect caring for the community while not compromising the health, safety and wellness of citizens and the environment.

What is important to you?

Lake Country tell Council what’s important to you. Now is the time to get involved in the 2022 Water Master Plan Revision. Take a moment to watch the three-minute whiteboard video to better understand the issues. The project team has also provided several links to help you find information you need to fill in the brief survey found below. Council appreciates your feedback in order to make informed decisions. Please fill in the survey by June 3rd. If you leave your email address you will be entered to win one of three $100 gift certificates for a restaurant of choice in Lake Country.


Feedback Required: Water Conservation Plan Due May 8th (REVISED DATE)

Thank you for taking the time to review the Draft Water Conservation Plan and for providing your comments.

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So I guess we can count 17.5 % plus increase in taxes for the next number years.
Thank you

Uninformed 9 months ago

The good ideas suggested for limiting water use in new residential developments should also be encouraged and incentivized in existing neighborhoods, with education, promotions. Is there any provincial funding or collaboration available for things like rain barrels, rain sensors, etc? Although not sure I agree on the value of rain barrels in saving water. During a significant rain event you need many more rain barrels than just one or 2 to capture water off your roof. That might help with watering initially but not during a prolonged dry period. There is an initial significant cost, then potential issues with maintenance, algae, mosquitos etc. Perhaps water storage systems including rain barrels, cisterns, reservoirs etc should be incorporated into new residential neighborhoods and commercial areas, as well as on existing public buildings.

Persistent targeted education, messaging and promotion of water use awareness and conservation is key. There should be diligent follow up on obvious water wastage such as irrigation water running down the street, or irrigation when its raining.

Are there potential water saving with individual unit metering in stratas, which are becoming more prevalent? In my strata my water rate is not based on actual consumption but square footage. There is no direct use accountability as a single occupant may pay the same for water as a family, although using much less. If a variable rate structure is implemented this discrepancy is even more unfair. How challenging is it to install individual meters in existing units and are individual meters now installed in new strata complexes?

I like the idea of using reclaimed water and groundwater extraction water sources for irrigation, if all health and environmental concerns are properly addressed and monitored. Obviously water rationing must also be mindful of agricultural needs and fire risk.

Elisabeth about 1 year ago

This email is in response to the District of Lake Country’s invitation to look over the Draft Water Conservation Plan and provide feedback by April 18th (2023?). This feedback is from the Lake Country Farmers’ Institute (LCFI).

LCFI formed to provide a voice for the farming community. LCFI is working to inform the residents, decision makers and DLC Staff about agriculture today and the future. LCFI membership includes farmers with soil-based agriculture, vertically integrated farms, and agri-tourism. The members include new farmers and multi-generational family farmers. The farms cover thousands of acres and have thousands of years of local knowledge and formal education.

The Lake Country Farmers’ Institute is requesting re-drafting of the DLC Water Conservation Plan after meaningful consultation has taken place with LCFI and subject experts. The re-draft would include the use of information from the 2023-2024 District of Lake Country’s Land Use Inventory for agriculture.
Lake Country farms grow and market food and beverages from tree fruit, grapes, vegetables, forage and livestock products for local and global consumption. The hearts of the farmers and the beauty of the farms bring visitors to the District of Lake Country. The importance of water for agriculture in the District of Lake Country cannot be overstated.

LCFI met with Mr. Ted Van Der Gulik on Tuesday, April 11, 2023. LCFI members know and trust Mr. Van Der Gulik’s expertise and understanding of agricultural water. Having roots in Lake Country, Mr. Van Der Gulik also has a wealth of local historical knowledge about water infrastructure and federal and provincial government grants, water licensing and land use changes. Mr. Van Der Gulik reminded us that Food Security requires land and water so with climate change and an increasing demand for food, securing agricultural water is a top priority. LCFI members reviewed the BC Water Calculator for Agriculture and members are ground proofing the information for their farms. LCFI also learned that the Land Use Inventory for the District of Lake Country is being updated in 2023 with the report to be finished in late 2024.

With the above information, LCFI is requesting the District of Lake Country Mayor and Council postpone the adoption of the Lake Country Water Conservation Plan and re-draft the agricultural water use sections after open and informed consultation with the Lake Country Farmers’ Institute and subject experts, for the benefit of all the residents of the District of Lake Country, including the farmers, and the mouths the farms feed locally and around the world. LCFI is looking forward to presenting to the DLC Mayor and Councillors on May 16th, 2023. The delegation will be providing information on the economic, social and environmental sustainability of DLC farms now and in the future.

Lake Country Farmers' Institute about 1 year ago

We need to reduce agricultural consumption through better water management systems, finding funding for farmers to switch to more effective watering would;d make a huge difference. Also on education things like promoting a 2 minute shower, low flow toilets, and removing lawns are needed. I don't think putting more cost on residential consumers is the way. As an Oyama Lake water source recipient I see improving the quality of water from this source as a priority more than charging us more. Also in townhouse developments as they don't have direct water meters households are not as aware of water consumption. Having these developments more accountable for usage could reduce consumption. All in all we ALL need to use less water, charging more just penalizes the most vulnerable in our community who are already more severely impacted by climate justice issues.

Ali B about 1 year ago

A very comprehensive plan with many moving parts. I'm going to look into joining the Water Advisory Committee

Janet about 1 year ago

The water conservation plan is a document that shows little understanding of agricultural water use. The analysis of the agricultural water use is misleading as there is no consideration for the numerous variables (e.g., land use, crop or livestock type, crop stage, climate, irrigation system, water use), no reporting of standard deviation, standard error, and median.
How does conserving water in Lake Country look to me from reading this plan? With a growing population, increasing domestic water demand and far-off potential for increasing water supply, conserving water appears to be providing domestic users with as much treated water as they can afford, by limiting treated irrigation water for agricultural users.

Russ & Lynn Lashuk about 1 year ago

We live just south of Okanagan Centre (before the road, Okanagan Centre Road West, heads up towards Lakestone). None of the houses in this section have water service and pull water from the lake. Water service should be provided as we are concerned about contamination in the lake as more developments above us drain their contaminated run off into the lake.

TomBell about 1 year ago

Looks good. Any efforts to conserve water particularly in outdoor water use are good; and just being more aware of small things that can be done to conserve indoor water use is excellent. The implementation of water meters made a significant difference on water consumption. I think all of the water conservation tools listed on page 6 of the plan should be used.

KarenMiller about 1 year ago

I think rain barrels are a good and inexpensive tactic that the District should subsidize and promote.

Devin about 1 year ago

I wasn’t able to review the Draft Water Conservatioon Plan as when I clicked on the link I got a garbled message. I am using my iPad to access this which is maybe a problem. It shouldn’t be but who knows what the internet genies can do.

Bev Sorensen about 1 year ago

It’s concerning that we are facing water shortages in Canada, and more so that the drinking water needs to be carefully treated in the house prior to drinking it. I’ve had to install a system that set me back 8,000 to ensure the drinking water is safe. My water is from beaver lake. Apart from the quality of water, we do need to ensure there is enough for people. I’ve got no seriously solutions, but know that filling a pool should come at a higher cost to those who see that a pool is more important than drinking water, and irrigation for our trees, shrubs, flowers. Yes, there is a priority, and we need to consider that the plants must come ahead of pools and hot tubs. I don’t care if you are trucking in water from elsewhere; water is not unlimited in the face of global warming and it should be reserved for drinking, and keeping the plants alive. Consider that when you choose to charge more - also keep in mind, charging more for water use does not bring more water… just money. Perhaps flip the concept and give tax breaks and incentives to those whom xeriscape. In fact you could most certainly see a change in water use, if you set a threshold and tell home owners they will see property tax reductions when the replace lawns with the right plant matter. You must educate them that ripping out grass and pouring out rocks is not xeriscape. In fact I’d increase taxes on homes that choose to use rocks as their replacement. Rock base heats snd drys the ground, helps bake the soil and lead to more heat/dry feedback. This is not proper xeriscape. You need to provide incentives to get folks to change - not tax people and charge more. Those who have funds won’t care and will not change. But they will always want to benefit from savings. Anyway, the beaver lake water is poor quality. I’ve personally had to spend thousands to make it drinkable - and I’m on a fixed income. From my view we are fighting a losing battle and when the water runs dry we are all doomed. So, I hope you will focus on encouraging planting more trees, to bring back natural spaces that will help to retain ground water, and soil base. We need to build smarter; and must consider the ability to have pools in everyone’s yard - just because you can, doesn’t mean we should? Look at places around the world who are in complete drought. We are not beyond becoming one. No one will escape climate change. Make it easy to change to xeriscape, give away rain barrels each season, and reduce property taxes to each home that embraces a shift to more sustainable landscape. We need to be good citizens for the planet, that means we are not the only ones who need and use the water - plants and flowers and trees are a part of a healthy planet.

Kevin about 1 year ago

Can you please e-mail the draft wayer conservation plan as I just receive an "access denied" page everytime I try to access it.
Cheers
Ron

Ron about 1 year ago

I’m wondering if there would be a cost sharing option between the District and users in rain barrel purchasing ?
A program whereby the district does a large bulk purchase of rain barrels and interested parties could get a discount on the product ?

Elizabeth about 1 year ago

When can we expect our water advisory to be lifted. We’ve had it now for over 10 years! We still pay the same rates as the Lakes and Lakestone for inferior water.

Gerry about 1 year ago

It would be great if there was a number to text and /or call when one sees a water main break and leakage. This should be agricultural and residential. I personally have witnessed so much water wasted in this manner.

Wendy about 1 year ago

Interesting that the dry periods are currently on a 6-year cycle: Dry periods in 2003, 2009, 2015, and 2021 across British Columbia have stressed the importance of proper drought management and led to Provincial measures for dealing with drought and water scarcity.
Great idea to have tours of our water facilities or creating contests for residents or students. Let's make it fun to understand the water needs. It is easier to educate students of all ages that are just learning about water usage as opposed to trying to change adults’ minds later in life.
Weird thought: TV commercials say you should run your dishwasher more often utilizing lower water products rather than waiting for the traditional full load. I am wondering if there is truth to this statement and how it could be "reworded".
A discussion with friends lately: Recyclers say: just rinse and throw cans/bottles/ etc. into the recycling. What about dog food cans or sweetened condensed milk. Yes, you saved a couple cans from the land fill but used 5 gallons of water to achieve this. Maybe recycling can offer better statements?
Love promoting rain barrels. It’s truly something I never really considered before but, I will now. Thanks for planting that seed in my mind.
Great idea: Being charged per cubic meter or variable rate structure for agricultural customers is recommended to help promote efficient watering systems that will reduce water consumption.
Personally, senior levels of government can be a challenge when determining local water releases. This is more appropriate at a District Level. Changes in the supply and the weather can be dramatic. Let the local people deal with this as opposed to senior government officials who probably rely too much on historical information and forecasting as opposed to actual current time events.

Tobi McNeil about 1 year ago

I think the district should get together with a landscape supplier to provide artificial turf, rocks, etc to encourage ways to cut back water useage for home owners. Watering grass is one of the biggest waste of water useage homeowners use. Artificial turf looks better in the heat of the summer and has zero water attached to it. If people want to do rock instead of turf, that would be another viable option.

Christine Smith about 1 year ago

Encourage, educate and require sustainable winegrowing practices:

Sustainable winegrowing is a comprehensive set of practices that are environmentally sound, socially equitable and economically viable. Sustainable winegrowing is being used by winegrape growers and vintners throughout California to grow and make high quality grapes and wine. These sustainable vineyard and winery practices conserve water and energy, maintain healthy soil, protect air and water quality, enhance relations with employees and communities, preserve local ecosystems and wildlife habitat and improve the economic vitality of vineyards and wineries.

Source:

https://wineinstitute.org/our-work/responsibility/sustainability/#:~:text=What%20is%20Sustainable%20Winegrowing%3F,high%20quality%20grapes%20and%20wine.

Marie about 1 year ago
Page last updated: 15 Apr 2024, 04:17 PM