Liquid Waste Management Plan

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Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP) - Project

Check out the results of the survey - click on the June 22nd presentation given to the Advisory Committee or the June 15th presentation given to the Steering Committee. Both presentations give a summary of the 254 surveys received.

Survey has been closed (June 8th) thank you to the 254 community members who took the time to fill out the survey. The four winners randomly selected will receive a $100 Lake Country Home Hardware Gift Certificates are:

  • Liz Ellison
  • Jim MacMaster
  • Linda Smith
  • Donna Schreyer

Congratulations!

Liquid Waste Management in Lake Country:

Have you ever given much thought to what happens after you flush the toilet? Pour something down the sink? Where does all of it go? Who deals with it? To help explain the process check out “What Happens When You Flush – Poop 101.”

Liquid waste in the District of Lake Country is managed through a Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP) that received Provincial approval in 1998. Storm water, septic systems, sewer collection and treatment are all addressed in a Liquid Waste Management Plan. As Lake Country grows, we need to continue to implement good solutions to serve an expanding population, care for the environment and protect public health.

Why do we need this project?

It's no secret that the District of Lake Country is one of the fastest growing communities in the Province. As new homes are added to the sewer system, capacity of the system becomes less and less, including the capacity of the ground to accept cleaned water. With 3,500 properties on the sewer system, the District is near maximum capacity and our soils will no longer be able to keep up with incoming flows. This means it's necessary to secure another option - soon!

Has work already been done to find a solution?

Over the last decade the District has been working on updating our Liquid Waste Management Plan. The District has undertaken numerous engineering and environmental studies and evaluations, in order to meet Provincial requirements. Now, as ground discharge is nearing maximum capacity, the District is looking for ministry approval for an alternate discharge option. Options that have been analyzed will be presented to the community in the coming weeks.

What are the timelines?

What's next?

This is where we need you - the community to get involved! Here's how:

1. Ask Questions:

  • Take a look at the video "What Happens When You Flush - Poop 101", FAQ's and important dates. This page will be updated regularly so come back often. if you have questions or would like more detail on any part of the LWMP please ask below.

2. Apply to be on the LWMP Public Advisory Committee:

  • As part of the LWMP the District will be putting together a public advisory committee. If you are interested in being part of the committee or finding out more information about the committee email Ruth Sulentich rsulentich@lakecountry.bc.ca. Applications will be accepted until April 1st.

3. Fill in the Survey:

  • Your opinion matters - fill in the survey by June 8th, survey can be found below.

Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP) - Project

Check out the results of the survey - click on the June 22nd presentation given to the Advisory Committee or the June 15th presentation given to the Steering Committee. Both presentations give a summary of the 254 surveys received.

Survey has been closed (June 8th) thank you to the 254 community members who took the time to fill out the survey. The four winners randomly selected will receive a $100 Lake Country Home Hardware Gift Certificates are:

  • Liz Ellison
  • Jim MacMaster
  • Linda Smith
  • Donna Schreyer

Congratulations!

Liquid Waste Management in Lake Country:

Have you ever given much thought to what happens after you flush the toilet? Pour something down the sink? Where does all of it go? Who deals with it? To help explain the process check out “What Happens When You Flush – Poop 101.”

Liquid waste in the District of Lake Country is managed through a Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP) that received Provincial approval in 1998. Storm water, septic systems, sewer collection and treatment are all addressed in a Liquid Waste Management Plan. As Lake Country grows, we need to continue to implement good solutions to serve an expanding population, care for the environment and protect public health.

Why do we need this project?

It's no secret that the District of Lake Country is one of the fastest growing communities in the Province. As new homes are added to the sewer system, capacity of the system becomes less and less, including the capacity of the ground to accept cleaned water. With 3,500 properties on the sewer system, the District is near maximum capacity and our soils will no longer be able to keep up with incoming flows. This means it's necessary to secure another option - soon!

Has work already been done to find a solution?

Over the last decade the District has been working on updating our Liquid Waste Management Plan. The District has undertaken numerous engineering and environmental studies and evaluations, in order to meet Provincial requirements. Now, as ground discharge is nearing maximum capacity, the District is looking for ministry approval for an alternate discharge option. Options that have been analyzed will be presented to the community in the coming weeks.

What are the timelines?

What's next?

This is where we need you - the community to get involved! Here's how:

1. Ask Questions:

  • Take a look at the video "What Happens When You Flush - Poop 101", FAQ's and important dates. This page will be updated regularly so come back often. if you have questions or would like more detail on any part of the LWMP please ask below.

2. Apply to be on the LWMP Public Advisory Committee:

  • As part of the LWMP the District will be putting together a public advisory committee. If you are interested in being part of the committee or finding out more information about the committee email Ruth Sulentich rsulentich@lakecountry.bc.ca. Applications will be accepted until April 1st.

3. Fill in the Survey:

  • Your opinion matters - fill in the survey by June 8th, survey can be found below.

Ask a Question or Provide Feedback on the Liquid Waste Management Plan Project

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    Why does Lake Country not have a public sani-dump? This is a service that communities much smaller than ours have and find it frustrating we cannot provide this service. There are plenty of ideal locations, the Arena being one.

    Doug Gunn asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. Wood Lake Campground does have a sani dump that the community can pay to use. The District has been and continues to investigate the possibility of creating a second location due to increased demand. 

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    How much is this going to cost? Are we going to have to pay again?

    nadco54 asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. The final solution and cost is still under review. Knowing that the upgrades were eventually going to take place finance has indeed been planning for the expenditure. Upgrades must be completed in the very near future. However the District will apply for federal and provincial grants as grant programs become available, however this is unknown and uncertain and cannot be relied on. 

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    Are there any plans to include an RV Sani Dump in the DLC area?

    Brad asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. There are two sani dumps already in Lake Country, both at local campgrounds. The District is investigating the possibility of a third Sani Dump. 

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    Stop multi dwelling permits and secondary suites permits until the waste management issue is under control. Increase waste management to include kitchen waste into the green bin as done in Surrey and other communities. Increase primary waste plant and/or put in a secondary, and/or tertiary waste management plant. Three stage system.

    LkCountyconcerns asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comments.

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    Are big developers example one next to rail trail funding the enlargement of the existing sewer treatment plant?

    Concerned long time resident asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. When developers subdivide a property in Lake Country they are required to pay a variety of Development Cost Charges (DCC) one of the cost being for sewer upgrades. Details on the cost can be found within the bylaw.

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    So I see from the Official Community Plan that there is no plan in the foreable future to extend a sewer system into Okanagan Centre. I also see that Okanagan Centre (Beaver Lake water) has been on a boil water advisory since 2012 and it appears there are no plans in place to construct a new water treatment facility or connect us to a different system. If we are not getting these services (and there are no plans for us to receive them) are the taxes for Okanagan residents adjusted accordingly?

    Gwen Graham asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. Beginning in 2010 extensive evaluation was done as part of the Stage 2 LWMP and the decision making was ongoing including the recent OCP update to evaluate which areas of the District should eventually be moved to sewer. Key components of the evaluation were the health of residents and protection of the environment. More densely populated areas or areas where future subdivisions are planned for, were given priority to connecting to the sewer.

    It is important to note that once sewer is brought to a neighbourhood, development and densification will likely occur shortly thereafter, changing the character of the area which is something important to also consider.

    The water master plan is currently being revised and public engagement will commence in September. There are indeed plans to build a water treatment facility and the team looks forward to hearing from the community on the options that will be presented. It is important to note that Beaver Lake water customers are not on a boil water advisory but rather a water quality advisory – the two are very different. Please take a minute to watch the short video produced by Interior Health on what a water quality advisory means.

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    Which area are you talking about putting sewers in We live on winview rd

    RobConelley asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. Properties that have been identified to be connected to the District sewer system are contained within the Official Community Plan. Sewer is referenced in Section 9.3 and Map 6.

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    Have you investigated waste management methods used by other BC municipalities?

    Terry asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. Collaboration with other municipalities of similar size and population has indeed been an important component of the long-term solution. Solutions that are appropriate for Lake Country will align with good industry and engineering practice.

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    How does this impact septic system users who have to pay parcel taxes even if they don't use sewer?

    kenricci asked 2 months ago

    Property owners within the District who are not on sewer pay an environmental parcel tax of $75 per parcel. The environmental parcel tax was implemented by Council to recognize that the development of a sewer system in Lake Country benefits the whole community and assists in protecting the environment.  The system also manages storm water of properties, roads and other infrastructure which benefits the whole community, not just properties who are on the District sewer system.

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    Hello How is it possible that much of OK Centre Rd West, Hare Rd and Nighthawk Rd are not included in the new sewer distribution plan? Much of this area is on lake-side slope and most of these homes have aging septic fields. When they malfunction, which many do each year, waste can drain into the lake and contaminate riparian areas. These areas are increasingly surrounded by medium-to-high density urban developments, making the island of septic tanks seem anachronistic. The density of this area requires a comprehensive sewer plan. It would be nice if you could show us the options that were considered before leaving these areas out. Regards

    Ellen asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for the question. The District cannot sewer the entire community all at once, due to cost and resources. Beginning in 2010 extensive evaluation was done as part of the Stage 2 LWMP and the decision making was ongoing including the recent OCP update to evaluate which areas of the District should eventually be moved to sewer. Key components of the evaluation were the health of residents and protection of the environment. More densely populated areas or areas where future subdivisions are planned for, were given priority to connecting to the sewer.